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No Time For Sergeants

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No Time For Sergeants


Published 1955


No Time For Sergeants chronicles the comedic misadventures of a country bumpkin named Will Stockdale, brilliantly protrayed by Andy Griffith, who is drafted into the U.S. Army during World War II and assigned to the United States Army Air Forces.
Andy Griffith went on to play the same character in the Broadway version and in a movie of the same name, which he became famous for and made him a star.

No Time For Sergeants

The U.S. Steel Hour
March 15th, 1955

Starring:
Will Stockdale......Andy Griffith
Sgt. King...........Harry Clark
Major...............Robert Emhardt
Ben Whitledge.......Eddie Le Roy
Captain.............Alexander Clark
Irvin...............Arthur Storch
Lucky...............Bob Hastings
Colonel.............G. Albert Smith
Infantry Sg.t.......Joe Brown, Jr.
WAF Captain.........Adnia Rice
Pfc.................Thomas Volk
Soldier.............George Kilroy


Based on the novel by Mac Hyman, copyright 1954

Written for television by Ira Levin
Produced by The Theatre Guild

Directed by Alex Segal

Editor..................S. Mark Smith
Story Department........Dorothy Hechtlinger
Design..................E. Albert Heschong
Art Director............James McNaughton
Costume Designer........Gene Coffin
Audio...................William Blumel
Video Engineer..........Rolf Drucker
Lighting................Imero Fiorentino
Composer-Conductor......Glenn Osser
Technical Director......George Weber
Associate Producer......John Haggott
Suggested by............Armina Marshall


Run time 50:02
Audio/Visual sound, black and white

comment
Reviews

Reviewer: skybandit - - November 2, 2010
Subject: PD questions:
"I Am Legend" by Richard Matheson is copyrighted, but "The Last Man on Earth" is PD. Why? Only the Mystic Lawyers of Mordor know for sure, but in the old days a novelist might sell out ALL film rights for a book to a certain film maker, and if the film went PD, had no way to enforce his or her copyright. Matheson's book was credited for "The Omega Man" and the puerile "I Am Legend" flicks, so he evidently learned his lesson. Could be Mac Hyman made a similar mistake here.
Reviewer: HaarFager872 - favoritefavoritefavoritefavoritefavorite - June 8, 2010
Subject: Public Domain
Well, thank goodness "the book" or the musical score wasn't uploaded here. Surely that's not how the Copyright system was supposed to work? You just make sure one thing is copyrighted and stays copyrighted and everything else derived from it is always "magically" protected? How come they were allowed to create the television series "Gmer Pyle USMC?" Surely the fact that it was heavily derived from "No Time For Sergeants" didn't go unrecognized by the Copyright Office back in 1964? Didn't they care about the copyright infringement? The whole matter confuses me greatly.
Reviewer: ken2ca - - June 8, 2010
Subject: PUBLIC DOMAIN?
Here's what worries me about this site. Titles like this get posted and listed as Public Domain. Granted, the "film" itself may have become PD because the copyright wasn't renewed, BUT, the content on which it is based, "the book" and the musical score, are all still under US Copyright. PLEASE scan these listings more thoroughly to this great site doesn't get shut down for copyright infringement.
Reviewer: Meatpies - - October 19, 2008
Subject: Mayberry RFD?
Nope... The star of that show was Ken Berry. You're thinking "the Andy Griffith Show".
Reviewer: John Esche - favoritefavoritefavoritefavorite - May 14, 2008
Subject: A fine prelude to Broadway
Well thank heavens for the days of live TV when a playwright like Ira Levin could tryout an hour adaptation of a novel on a show like The Theatre Guild on The Air and have it picked up for full stage production like this one was. While only stand-up comedian ("What It Was Was Football") Andy Griffith repeated his role (in 1955 to a Tony nomination in 1956) on stage and later (1958) film, it kick-started the career that went on famously to Mayberry, R.F.D., Matlock & others, Peter Larkin's Tony Award winning sets were clearly inspired by the design and art direction by E. Albert Heschong and James McNaughton here. The original TV production has all the sharpness and sparkle of the stage production (and most of the incidents). Well worth a look if you want more than just the usual mindless 50's comedy fare that was scared to death of content that might offend either "Mrs. Grundy" or H.U.A.C.. A country only a decade from WWII and less from Korea recognized "Will Stockdale" and reveled in his innocence the way they did in the different perspective of Phil Silvers' deliciously conniving Sgt. Bilko (that knocked "Uncle Miltie" off the air in the ratings wars).
Reviewer: streak - - April 21, 2008
Subject: Standard TV fare for the 50s
There needs to be a rating scale defined,


Andy came a long way from this to the "Andy Griffin Show" it has its humorous moments but a steady diet of this would be dangerous to ones mental health.
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